Journal of Sports Science-David Publishing Company
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  Journal of Sports Science

Volume 1, Number 1, December 2013

Frequency:monthly
ISSN:2332-7839
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Volume 1, Number 1, December 2013
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1-14

Fans Online Services Expectations and Experiences: The Case of National Basketball Association

Yann Abdourazakou, Nicolas Lorgnier, Shawn ORourke, Norman OReilly and Gashaw Abeza


  

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the online service expectations of fans of professional sport. Participants were asked about their online experience and the impact it had on a number of variables, including satisfaction and service quality. Three dimensions regarding the online experience were identified. First, the core product represents the set of items influencing fans perceptions of the quality of the game; second, the ancillary products characterizing the derivative products related to the game; and finally, the efficiency of support services used to access the core and ancillary products online. The study found that although respondents reported higher expectations of the core product than of the ancillary products, their expectations of support services efficiency were also very high. Understanding fans specific expectations enables sport organizations to identify and fulfill fans expectations of their online experience. The studys results are reviewed in the context of previous research and practice to suggest a future research protocol to aid managers understanding of online fans expectations and satisfaction with service provided.

 

Key words: Services marketing, consumer marketing, online marketing, professional sport, e-quality.

15-25

In Accordance with Governmental RecommendationsA Study of Golf and Health

Jan Ove Tangen, Arnstein Sunde, Jostein Sageie, Per Chr. Hagen, Bjørn Kristoffersen, Roy Istad, Tor Lønnestad and Inger Lise Eriksrud Bergan


  

Abstract: Norwegian authorities recommend that adults and elderly people be physically active for at least 30 min every day at moderate to high levels of intensity. This is equivalent to approximately 10,000 steps a day. This research study seeks to determine whether golf is beneficial to individual health as defined by the governmental recommendations. The study included 29 participants, whose heart rate, playing time, and walked distance were measured as they carried a GPS (global position system) receiver. Male players walked on average 11,256 830 m while female players walked on average 10,000 595 m. Thus, men tended to walk 1.98 times the course length while women walked 2.13 times the course length. The duration of the golf round averaged 269 25.4 min (i.e., 4 h 29 min); for men, the mean duration was 271 min, and for women, it was 267 min. The average heart rate was 104.1 14.5 bpm for male players and 110.8 16.9 bpm for the female players. Based on the energy expenditure in kcal on the golf course, male players used 2,467 kcal on average while female players used 1,587 kcal on average during a round of golf. Comparing the hilliness of two different golf courses, it indicated that golf playing could be a form of interval training. Our results strongly indicate that golf is beneficial to health as defined in the governmental recommendations.

 

Key words: Physical activity, walked distance, energy expenditure, health promoting.

26-36
  

Abstract: There is a growing public concern about the increasing use of performance enhancing drugs (doping) in sport, exercise and fitness activities. Research has been carried out to answer the question Why do exercising young people use performance enhancing drugs? The explanations of most quantitative researches are based on bivariate statistical analysis. But there are reasons to believe that one factor or motive is not suffice to explain such a complex and stigmatized behaviour. More probably, there may be clusters of psychological and societal, more or less hidden, reasons behind such behaviour. This study uses EFA (exploratory factor analysis) and combines sets of variables, in order to reveal hidden factors or patterns in the empirical data. Our study indicates that this kind of doping use should be interpreted within a social context where youths struggle with their lives, making sense of societal demands and expectations, using the tools they find fitting, and make their choices meaningful and functional. In other words, doping has something to do with muscles, self-presentation and meaning trying to build identities in a world where the body is the main symbol of value and morality.

 

Key words: Performance enhancing drugs, youth, exercise, identity, self-presentation, meaning.

37-45

Power Output and Electromyography Activity of the Back Squat Exercise with Cluster Sets

Jordan M. Joy, Jonathan M. Oliver, Sean A. McCleary, Ryan P. Lowery and Jacob M. Wilson


  

Abstract: Recently, it has been demonstrated that hypertrophic training with CLU (cluster) sets produces greater strength and power following a 12-week periodized program. The results suggest possible differences in neuromuscular adaptations. Therefore, we sought to compare the acute effect of TRD (traditional) and CLU set configurations during the parallel back squat on mean power output and integrated EMG (electromyography) activity of the VL (vastus lateralis) and BF (biceps femoris). Ten males (23 2.4 years; height 182.9 6.1 cm; weight 86.2 4.2 kg; 5 2 years training) performed the parallel back squat using TRD and CLU with 75% 1RM (one-repetition maximum) in a randomized crossover design. Data was analyzed by a repeated measuresANOVA (analysis of variance). A significant effect of set (P = 0.006) was observed in mean power output. Mean power output decreased over each successive set when collapsed for condition. Clusters resulted in greater mean power output during latter repetitions of each set (repetition 4, 6-10; P < 0.05). A significant effect of set (P = 0.049) was observed in VL EMG. VL EMG increased over each successive set when collapsed for condition. TRD training produced significantly greater VL EMG during latter repetitions of each set (repetition 6-8; P < 0.05). An interaction was observed in BF EMG. No significant differences were observed in post-hoc. Thus, cluster sets can be used to achieve greater power output, but greater neuromuscular activity should not be expected relative to traditional training.

 

Key words: Cluster, interset rest, electromyography, power, squat, intraset rest.

46-51
  

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate if Exercise Science students perceived their professors having high intelligence, based on a certain somatotype. A survey was conducted on 107 Exercise Science students at a Midwestern public university. Each student was shown pictures (male and female) of Sheldons three somatotypes (ectomorph, endomorph, and mesomorph) and asked one question about their impression from each photo. A Wilks Lambda distribution concluded at least two of the means for each somatotype group were significantly different. A pairwise comparison analysis was conducted which indicated that all of the group means were different from each other. Upon further examination of the data, a statistical significance was found using a multinomial logistic regression. The researchers hypothesis was confirmed in that there was a difference in opinion regarding students perception on Exercise Science professors. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that overweight people are also often perceived as less intelligent, unpopular, and unsuccessful than people of average weight. The findings in this study do support the outcomes of the research from previous investigations.

 

Key words: Perception, intelligence, somatotype.

52-57
  

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of three different rest intervals on the sustainability of squat and bench press on consecutive sets at 90% with 1RM (1 repetition maximum)-loads. Design and methods: Fifteen karate men were chosen to participate in this study (age of 22/3 2/1 years; height 172/6 3/6 cm; weight 67/8 5/2 kg). All subjects performed 7 sessions of squat & bench press with 48 h intervals. At the first session, 1RM was measured. During the rest 6 sessions, athletes performed 4 times squat & bench press with 90% (1RM) at each session, one of three different rest intervals (60, 180, 225 seconds) were used randomly between sets. Number of repetitions performed & repetition sustainability between different rest intervals were recorded. Results with Boneferoni method showed that each three different rest intervals caused decline in repetitions in squat &bench press. The repetition decline was significant in the bench press and squat. Repetition sustainability in 225 s in compare to 60 & 180 s was more significant. Repetition sustainability also was higher in 180 s in compare to 60 s. On basis of findings from this study, we can recommend for best performance in bench press & squat, rest intervals of 225 s, to maintain consecutive repetitions.

 

Key words: Rest interval, sustainability of repetition, recovery, fatigue.

 
 

 

 

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Journal of Sports Science is an international, scholarly and peer-reviewed journal (print and online) published bimonthly by David Publishing Company, USA, which was founded in 2001. It publishes articles of a high standard on various aspects of the sports sciences covering a number of disciplinary bases, including Sports Management; Sports Anatomy; Exercise Physiology; Exercise Biochemistry; Sports Trauma; Sports Training; Sports Psychology; Sports Practice and Analysis; Sports Humanities and Sociology; Physical Education Teaching; Sports Law; Sports Industry and Market Development; Sports News; Sports English; Sports Tourism, as well as ergonomics, kinanthropometry and other interdisciplinary perspectives. The journal is published in English. Accepted papers will immediately appear online followed by printed in hard copy.

 

In addition to reports of research, review articles and book reviews are published. The emphasis of the Journal is on the human sciences, broadly defined, applied to sport and exercise. Besides experimental work in human responses to exercise, the subjects covered will include human responses to technologies such as the design of sports equipment and playing facilities, research in training, selection, performance prediction or modification, and stress reduction or manifestation. Manuscripts dealing with original investigations of exercise, validation of technological innovations in sport or comprehensive reviews of topics relevant to the scientific study of sport will be considered for publication.

 

The Journal presents research findings in the growing area of exercise and sports sciences to an international audience. The readership for this journal is varied and ranges from academic research workers to professionals in recreation, sports coaching and training.

 

Information for Authors

1. The manuscript should be original, and has not been published previously. Do not submit material that is currently being considered by another journal.

2. Manuscripts may be 4000-15000 words or longer if approved by the editor, including an abstract, texts, tables, footnotes, appendixes, and references. The title should be on page 1 and not exceed 15 words, and should be followed by an abstract of 100-200 words. 3-5 keywords or key phrases are required.

3. The manuscript should be in MS Word format, submitted as an email attachment to our email address.

4. Authors of the articles being accepted are required to sign up the Transfer of Copyright Agreement form.

5. Author will receive 2 hard copies of the journal containing their articles.

6. If the paper is selected, the authors have to pay for the publication. 

 

Peer Review Policy

Journal of Sports Science is a refereed journal. All research articles in this journal undergo rigorous peer review, based on initial editor screening and anonymous refereeing by at least two anonymous referees.

 

Information for Authors

1. The manuscript should be original, and has not been published previously. Do not submit material that is currently being considered by another journal.

2. Manuscripts may be 4000-15000 words or longer if approved by the editor, including an abstract, texts, tables, footnotes, appendixes, and references. The title should be on page 1 and not exceed 15 words, and should be followed by an abstract of 100-200 words. 3-5 keywords or key phrases are required.

3. The manuscript should be in MS Word format, submitted as an email attachment to our email address.

4. Authors of the articles being accepted are required to sign up the Transfer of Copyright Agreement form.

5. Author will receive 2 hard copies of the journal containing their articles.

6. If the paper is selected, the authors have to pay for the publication. 

 

Peer Review Policy

Journal of Sports Science is a refereed journal. All research articles in this journal undergo rigorous peer review, based on initial editor screening and anonymous refereeing by at least two anonymous referees.

 

Editorial Procedures

All papers considered appropriate for this journal are reviewed anonymously by at least two outside reviewers. The review process usually takes two to three weeks. Papers are accepted for publication subject to no substantive, stylistic editing. The Editor reserves the right to make any necessary changes in the papers, or request the author to do so, or reject the paper submitted. A copy of the edited paper along with the first proofs will be sent to the author for proofreading. They should be corrected and returned to the Editor within seven days. Once the final version of the paper has been accepted, authors are requested not to make further changes to the text.

 

Submission of Manuscript

All manuscripts submitted will be considered for publication. Manuscripts should be sent online or as an email attachment to: sports@davidpublishing.com, sports@davidpublishing.org.

 

outside reviewers. The review process usually takes two to three weeks. Papers are accepted for publication subject to no substantive, stylistic editing. The Editor reserves the right to make any necessary changes in the papers, or request the author to do so, or reject the paper submitted. A copy of the edited paper along with the first proofs will be sent to the author for proofreading. They should be corrected and returned to the Editor within seven days. Once the final version of the paper has been accepted, authors are requested not to make further changes to the text.

 

Submission of Manuscript

All manuscripts submitted will be considered for publication. Manuscripts should be sent online or as an email attachment to: sports@davidpublishing.com, sports@davidpublishing.org.

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